Conserving Client’s Fuel and Power

One of my predictions for 2014 was the extent of the impact that the new building regulations under Part L will have on the construction industry and the occupier market from this Spring onwards.
The new Part L regulations come into effect in April and apply equally to new homes, as well as non-domestic buildings, where there will be an insistence on the inclusion of energy saving features, such as better fabric insulation and increased efficient provision of heating and lighting.  There are also issues involved with existing properties’ energy efficiency and “embodied carbon”.
Doubtless the new regulations will have cost implications for anybody constructing extensions or new build projects, and the building industry is only now beginning to positively plan for the more stringent legislation that is coming through.
Our role as construction advisors will be to explain and advise our clients on working with Part L building regulations, and how this will, hopefully, have positive effects beyond the potential problems of the increased initial cost.
The RICS commented in 2013 about the Green Deal having failed to take off and the retro fitting of property that had not materialised as hoped originally under the scheme.  Consequently, there has not been the flow of “green jobs” for construction and building companies that the Government predicted at its launch in 2011.  Perhaps this is about to change?
For advice on Part L building regulations and for building project plans, contact one of the Building or Project team at Harris Lamb.
Paul Wells
One of my predictions for 2014 was the extent of the impact that the new building regulations under Part L will have on the construction industry and the occupier market from this Spring onwards.

The new Part L regulations come into effect in April and apply equally to new homes, as well as non-domestic buildings, where there will be an insistence on the inclusion of energy saving features, such as better fabric insulation and increased efficient provision of heating and lighting.  There are also issues involved with existing properties’ energy efficiency and “embodied carbon”.

Doubtless the new regulations will have cost implications for anybody constructing extensions or new build projects, and the building industry is only now beginning to positively plan for the more stringent legislation that is coming through.

Our role as construction advisors will be to explain and advise our clients on working with Part L building regulations, and how this will, hopefully, have positive effects beyond the potential problems of the increased initial cost.

The RICS commented in 2013 about the Green Deal having failed to take off and the retro fitting of property that had not materialised as hoped originally under the scheme.  Consequently, there has not been the flow of “green jobs” for construction and building companies that the Government predicted at its launch in 2011.  Perhaps this is about to change?

For advice on Part L building regulations and for building project plans, contact one of the Building or Project team at Harris Lamb.

Paul Wells